ALANNA KETLER      

The invention of the chair was really a total game changer in regards to how our bodies function and which parts of the body we are using on a regular basis. The chair took all of that pressure off of our rears and backs, and relieved some of our weight for us. Of course, we always had the option to sit on the ground or perhaps in a tree, but the chair became such a fundamental piece of furniture in our lives that it absolutely changed how our bodies function.

By now, most of us are aware of just how detrimental it can be to our bodies to sit for a prolonged period of time, in fact, some researchers are even going as far as to say that sitting is the new smoking in terms of the potential damage it can cause to our bodies. With so many of us, myself included, working desk jobs on computers this really is important information to be aware of. Sitting is wreaking havoc on our bodies. Luckily, as the awareness grows towards this important health issue, we are seeing many new designs for standing desks, or things like core chairs that are aimed to utilize the muscles in our body and effectively relieve the issues that too much sitting can cause. But is there a much simpler option that humans have forgotten?

How The Forgotten Art Of Squatting Can Help You

Squatting is essentially a position of the body that humans have used for thousands of years, and in many cultures is still being used today. If you practice yoga, you might know this position as a Malasana, which is essentially a deep squat. A yoga instructor once said that a guru told them that “the problem with the west is that they don’t squat.” This is so true, if you aren’t someone who practices yoga or – does squats during a workout, when are you really going to squat? If we feel like taking a rest, we’re definitely choosing the chair or the big comfy couch before squatting down. We eat in chairs, sit in our cars and on the train, sit on the toilet – essentially, we are often only not sitting when we are walking from one chair to the next. In fact, many of us probably couldn’t even squat down to the ground if we tried, not without some serious stretching first at least.

Our lack of squatting has bio-mechanical and physiological implications, but perhaps it is inhibiting us from the grounding force that this posture provides as well. The lack of squatting is actually only really an issue for the westernized civilizations as there are many cultures around the world that are squatting down any chance they get, to eat, to pray, to use the toilet – yes, squatting toilets are the norm in Asia, and actually make way more sense. Squatting, in more undeveloped nations is also the most common way for women to give birth, and again when you really think about it, it also makes much more sense than lying on your back in a hospital bed.

In these “less advanced” cultures, the rich and middle class are not squatting either, as it is generally seen as something that the poor do as it is uncomfortable and actually causes the body to work. Have you ever heard the expression, “If you don’t use it, you lose it”? Well, this can be said in regards to squatting because if you were to give it a try now, you may find it very difficult, especially for a prolonged period of time. But, our bodies are amazing organisms and they can always transform.

According to author and osteopath, Philip Beach, “The game started with squatting,”  Beach is known for pioneering the idea of “archetypal postures.” These positions—which, in addition to a deep passive squat with the feet flat on the floor, include sitting cross-legged and kneeling on one’s knees and heels—are not just good for us, but according to beach they are  “deeply embedded into the way our bodies are built.”

“You really don’t understand human bodies until you realize how important these postures are,” Beach, who is based in Wellington, New Zealand, tells me. “Here in New Zealand, it’s cold and wet and muddy. Without modern trousers, I wouldn’t want to put my backside in the cold wet mud, so  [in absence of a chair] I would spend a lot of time squatting. The same thing with going to the toilet. The whole way your physiology is built is around these postures.”

Why Is Squatting Good For Us?

According to Dr. Bahram Jam, founder of Advanced Physical Therapy Education Institute in Ontario, Canada, “Every joint in our body has synovial fluid in it. This is the oil in our body that provides nutrition to the cartilage,” Jam says. “Two things are required to produce that fluid: movement and compression. So if a joint doesn’t go through its full range—if the hips and knees never go past 90 degrees—the body says ‘I’m not being used’ and starts to degenerate and stops the production of synovial fluid.”

A healthy musculoskeletal system is much more important for our health than just helping us to feel limber, strong and flexible, a study published in 2014 from the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that those participants who had a difficult time getting up off the floor without support of hands, elbows or leg remarkably resulted in having a three-year-year shorter life expectancy than those who got up with ease.

So, Why Did We Stop Squatting?

It seems that in the West, we stopped squatting around the same time as the modern seated toilet came into our existence. It might not seem like this alone would be a cause for such a drastic change to our physiology, but as Jam says, “The reason squatting is so uncomfortable because we don’t do it,” Jam says. “But if you go to the restroom once or twice a day for a bowel movement and five times a day for bladder function, that’s five or six times a day you’ve squatted.”

As we sit in our office chairs, staring at our computers in our office attire, for men slacks and dress shirts and often for women pencil skirts and dresses – can you even imagine trying to squat or sit cross-legged? Both of which would be much better for our health than sitting in chairs. It’s interesting how we seem to think we’ve come so far, and that we are much more civilised and advanced, but really we aren’t doing ourselves any favors with this arrogant attitude.

“It’s considered primitive and of low social status to squat somewhere,” says Jam. “When we think of squatting we think of a peasant in India, or an African village tribesman, or an unhygienic city floor. We think we’ve evolved past that—but really we’ve devolved away from it.”

Time To Start Squatting?

If you can, practice squatting down a few times a day. If you can’t, start by stretching your body and getting down as low as you can, if you are very rigid, it may take time, but doing some light stretching or yoga daily can assist you with this process. It is very good for our health! Especially if you are sitting on a chair all day at your place of employment, you might want to consider setting a reminder on your phone to remind you to get up and squat down at least a few times a day.

All the best!

In 2015, a Scandinavian study found no increased risk for Multiple Sclerosis or demyelinating disease among 4 million females, of whom 800,000 received the HPV vaccination.

But at a recent forum in San Diego, researchers presented two cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) that had developed in teenagers after receiving Gardasil, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

The study author Ye Hu reported on 2 teens who experienced MS symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after receiving the vaccination.

A 14-year-old male started to experience left retro-orbital pain and blurred vision in the left eye 2 weeks after receiving his third dose of Gardasil. He was diagnosed with left optic neuritis and reported a second occurrence 2 months after his initial symptoms.

A 17-year-old female started to experience blurred vision in the right eye 2 weeks after receiving her first dose of Gardasil. A right frontal enhancing lesion was seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). She was diagnosed with right optic neuritis and did not receive further doses of Gardasil. One week after discharge, she experienced intermittent numbness and weakness in her lower extremities in addition to blurred vision in her right eye. A repeat brain MRI revealed a new left parieto-occipital enhancing lesion.

It is pleasing to read of this research, which is the start of much more to come and signals an opening up of a conversation that acknowledges the problems associated with the HPV vaccines manifesting in thousands of adverse events and hundreds of deaths occurring after the vaccination.

According to VAERS, the CDC’s vaccine adverse event reporting system, there have been 53 cases of multiple sclerosis reported after vaccination with Gardasil and two following the new HPV vaccine Gardasil 9. This is the tip of the iceberg as very few adverse events are reported with most people ignorant of where or how they are to go about the process of having their adverse health event recorded. Then there’s the problem of determining if symptoms of an adverse event are causally linked to vaccines or a coincidence.

Canadian researchers, Lucija Tomljenovic and Christopher A Shaw, note that there are no conclusive tests available to determine whether adverse events are causally linked to vaccinations. They discuss the fact that many of the symptoms reported to the various reporting systems following HPV vaccination point to a diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels in the brain) but are not recognized as such. Symptoms of cerebral vasculitis include:

  • intense persistent migraines
  • syncope
  • seizures
  • tremors and tingling
  • myalgia
  • locomotor abnormalities
  • psychotic symptoms and cognitive deficits

The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can also be similar to those of other diseases such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and include problems with coordination and speech, sight difficulties, fatigue and weakness.

In my book Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed I relate the experience of Kristin Clulow, a 26-year-old Australian woman who after her second shot of Gardasil found her health beginning to unravel in a devastating way.

It started with a temporary loss of vision and mobility problems that made it impossible for her to run, jump, dance or wear her beloved heels. Then her handwriting failed her: “Handwriting just doesn’t suddenly go,” she cried. Worse was to come when Kristin’s  speech became slurred: “They thought I’d had a stroke.”

Kristin was initially given the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and treated unsuccessfully with corticosteroids. Further tests revealed that she was suffering from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating condition that predominately affects the white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating disease affecting the central nervous system with interference occurring in nerve impulses within the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. The average age for a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is 30, but in recent years the number of younger women diagnosed with the disease in Australia has risen dramatically. It used to affect men and women equally but now women are three times more likely to be affected.

Recently, I came across a young woman who was relieved to be diagnosed with MS because no-one had been able to tell her why she was unwell. Her symptoms began when she was 13 and consisted of headaches, sensory deficit affecting her leg, and fatigue resulting in her missing a lot of school.

I wondered as I listened to her story if she might be suffering a vaccine injury.  Neurological dysfunction is one of the very common adverse events of the Gardasil vaccine. Her symptoms started at 13, the age that Gardasil is given to young teens as part of the school vaccination program.

In all of this, I have to wonder just how many girls and boys are diagnosed with MS and other neurological conditions and autoimmune diseases rather than with a vaccine injury. Sometimes the correct diagnosis is eventually made as it was in the case of Naomi Snell, a 28-year-old Melbourne woman  who suffered autoimmune and neurological problems following her Gardasil vaccination. Snell was initially diagnosed with multiple sclerosis  but was later diagnosed as suffering a neurological response to the vaccine.

Vigibase, the World Health Organisation’s database of adverse events reports 36,915 nervous system disorders following Gardasil vaccination. But then each shot of Gardasil contains 225 mcgs of aluminium, a neurotoxin used as an adjuvent to stimulate a vaccine immune response. When Kristin Clulow had a mineral analysis of her hair done it showed that her body was high in aluminium.

Once in the body, injected aluminium can migrate and accumulate in the brain. Scientists at Keele University have recently discovered the way the aluminium in vaccine adjuvants travels from the site of injection to the brain.

The toxic potential of aluminum is high. This study has demonstrated that injecting alum adjuvants with vaccines results in transference to the brain, where it persists.

Such research must be continued and heeded by those in power who continue to prescribe an ever-increasing number of vaccines often laden with aluminium adjuvants needed to bring about an immune response.

As the new school year begins, Australian teenagers will be offered the latest HPV vaccine Gardasil 9 which contains even more of the aluminium adjuvant than the quadrivalent HPV vaccine Gardasil. One shot of Gardasil 9 has 500 micrograms of this known neurotoxin. Girls and boys will receive two shots of the vaccine, bringing the total amount of aluminium injected into their young bodies up to 1000mcg.

Gardasil and Gardasil 9 contain amorphous aluminium hydroxyphosphate sulphate (AAHS) a new form of aluminium which causes the immune system to become 104 times more powerfully stimulated than would occur naturally.

The adverse events in their many forms can be avoided. The HPV vaccination programs must be stopped. Our teenagers do not need HPV vaccines to prevent them from cervical cancer. Since the Australian National Cervical Screening Program began in 1991, the number of deaths from the cervical cancer have halved. There is no epidemic of the disease in western nations. In 2014, there were 223 deaths from cervical cancer in Australia and the deaths were mostly among elderly women.

And yet we have institutionalised this vaccine for every teenager.

In “FDA approved Gardasil 9: Malfeasance or Stupidity?,” Norma Erickson examined the Gardasil 9 package insert where she found that the rate of serious adverse events in the trials of Gardasil 9 was 2.3-2.5%. This means that for every 100,000 people who are given Gardasil 9, there will be 2,300 serious adverse events, and yet the cervical cancer rate in the U.S. is around 7 women per 100,000. This is insanity!

Expect to hear more research linking HPV vaccines to neurological events and autoimmune diseases. The truth will come out!