Ukrainian Indictment Claims $7.4 Billion Obama-Linked Laundering, Puts Biden Group Take At $16.5 Million

By Tyler Durden

 

Warning: Thanks to fellow blogger Jill, she brought to my attention that this disinfo is a HOAX! It was spread via rumour on social media and made it’s way onto Zerohedge’s site. This news story is not credible or based on proof.  *Warning*

November 20, 2019 “Information Clearing House” – An indictment drawn up by Ukraine’s Office of the Prosecutor General against Burisma owner Nikolai Zlochevsky claims that Hunter Biden and his partners received $16.5 million for their ‘services’ – according to Ukrainian MP Alexander Dubinsky of the ruling Servant of the People Party.

Dubinsky made the claim in a Wednesday press conference, citing materials from an investigation into Zlochevsky and Burisma.

“Zlochevsky was charged with this new accusation by the Office of the Prosecutor General but the press ignored it,” said the MP. “It was issued on November 14.”

The son of Vice-President Joe Biden was receiving payment for his services, with money raised through criminal means and money laundering,” he then said, adding “Biden received money that did not come from the company’s successful operation but rather from money stolen from citizens.”

According to Dubinsky, Hunter Biden’s income from Burisma is a “link that reveals how money is siphoned [from Ukraine],” and how Biden is just one link in the chain of Zlochevsky’s money laundering operation which included politicians from the previous Yanukovich administration who continued their schemes under his successor, President Pyotr Poroshenko.

“We will reveal the information about the financial pyramid scheme that was created in Ukraine and developed by everyone beginning with Yanukovich and later by Poroshenko. This system is still working under the guidance of the current managerial board of the National Bank, ensuring that money flows in the interest of people who stole millions of dollars, took it offshore and bought Ukrainian public bonds turning them into the Ukrainian sovereign debt,” said Dubinsky, adding that “in both cases of Yanukovich and Poroshenko, Ms. Gontareva and companies she controls were investing the stolen funds.”

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Franklin Templeton named

According to Interfax-Ukraine, MP Andriy Derkach announced at the same press conference that deputies have received new materials from investigative journalists alleging that the ‘family’ of ex-President Yanukovych funneled $7.4 billion through American investment firm Franklin Templeton Investments, which they claim have connections to the US Democratic party.

“Last week, November 14, the Prosecutor General’s Office (PGO), unnoticed by the media, announced a new suspicion to the notorious owner of Burisma, ex-Ecology Minister Zlochevsky. According to the suspicion, the Yanukovych family is suspected, in particular, with legalizing (laundering) of criminally obtained income through Franklin Templeton Investments, an investment fund carrying out purchases of external government loan bonds totaling $7.4 billion,” said Derkach, adding that the money was criminally obtained and invested in the purchase of Ukrainian debt in 2013 – 2014.

The son of Templeton’s founder, John

Templeton Jr., was one of President Obama’s major campaign donors. Another fund-related character is Thomas Donilon. Managing Director of BlackRock Investment Institute, shareholder Franklin Templeton Investments, which has the largest share in the fund. It is noteworthy that he previously was Obama’s national security advisor,” Derkach added.

Derkach then demanded “President Zelensky must pick up the phone, dial Trump, ask for help and cooperation in the fight against corruption and fly to Washington. The issue of combating international corruption in Ukraine with the participation of citizens, businessmen and U.S. officials should become a key during the meeting of the two presidents.”

 

This article was originally published by “Zerohedge” –   

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Windows 10 fake update is nasty ransomware

Protect yourself now

A new malware campaign is under way: emails sent from a fake Microsoft address are pushing people to download a malicious Windows 10 “critical update”. Beware!

Spotted by computer security company Trustwave, the subject of the mail says “Install Latest Microsoft Update now!” or “Critical Microsoft Windows Update!” The mail contains one single line that says “Please install the latest critical update from Microsoft attached to this mail” and an attached file.

If you receive such an email, here are the steps you should take:

1. Delete the mail right away.

2. Write several post-it notes that say “Microsoft NEVER SENDS update notices via email” and place them around your home and loved ones’ computers.

How this malware works

The mail contains a jpg file that is actually not a picture but an executable .NET file that will infect your PC.

This executable will download a program called “bitcoingenerator.exe” which comes from misterbtc2020 — a GitHub account. But this bitcoin generator doesn’t generate any virtual riches: it’s a ransomware called Cyborg.

Cyborg will encrypt all your files, locking their contents and changing their extensions to 777. You will also find a text file on your desktop named “Cyborg_DECRYPT.txt”, containing instructions about how to recover your life — for a price.

According to Trustwave, there are four variants of this malicious software. Following the trail, they reached to Russia. Because, of course it was going to be Russia.

Trustwave says this is a real danger to businesses and individuals alike, with the capacity to be attached to other emails and evade any gateway controls.

With that in mind, it’s good to remember to always distrust any mails you get, even if you think they come from a trustworthy source, and never blindingly click on something you didn’t ask for — even if you have the best antivirus software installed. You never know when the next malware will hit.

Your Router’s Security Stinks: Here’s How to Fix It

Most home Internet routers have serious security flaws, with some so vulnerable to attack they should be thrown out, an expert warns.

Most gateway routers used by home customers are profoundly not secure, and some routers are so vulnerable to attack that they should be thrown out, a security expert said at the HOPE X hacker conference in New York.

“If a router is sold at [an electronics chain], you don’t want to buy it,” independent computer consultant Michael Horowitz said in a presentation. “If your router is given to you by your internet service provider [ISP], you don’t want to use it either, because they give away millions of them, and that makes them a prime target both for spy agencies and bad guys.”

Horowitz recommended that security-conscious consumers instead upgrade to commercial routers intended for small businesses, or at least separate their modems and routers into two separate devices. (Many “gateway” units, often supplied by ISPs, act as both.) Failing either of those options, Horowitz gave a list of precautions users could take.

Problems with consumer routers

Routers are the essential but unheralded workhorses of modern computer networking, yet few home users realize they are computers, with their own operating systems, software and vulnerabilities.

MORE: Best Home Wi-Fi Routers

“A compromised router can spy on you,” Horowitz said, explaining that a router under an attacker’s control can stage a man-in-the-middle attack, alter unencrypted data or send the user to “evil twin” websites masquerading as often-used webmail or online-banking portals.

Many consumer-grade home-gateway devices fail to notify users if and when firmware updates become available, even though those updates are essential to patch security holes, Horowitz noted. Some other devices will not accept passwords longer than 16 characters.

Millions of routers throughout the world have the Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) networking protocol enabled on internet-facing ports, which exposes them to external attack.

“UPnP was designed for LANs [local area networks], and as such, it has no security. In and of itself, it’s not such a big deal,” Horowitz said. But, he added, “UPnP on the internet is like going in for surgery and having the doctor work on the wrong leg.”

Another problem is the Home Network Administration Protocol (HNAP), a management tool found on some consumer-grade routers that transmits sensitive information about the router over the Web at http://%5Brouter IP address]/HNAP1/, and grants full control to remote users who provide administrative usernames and passwords (which many users never change from the factory defaults).

In 2014, a router worm called TheMoon used the HNAP protocol to identify vulnerable Linksys-brand routers to which it could spread itself. (Linksys quickly issued a firmware patch.)

“As soon as you get home, this is something you want to do with all your routers,” Horowitz told the tech-savvy crowd. “Go to /HNAP1/, and, hopefully, you’ll get no response back, if that’s the only good thing. Frankly, if you get any response back, I would throw the router out.”

The WPS Threat

Worst of all is Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS), an ease-of-use feature that lets users bypass the network password and connect devices to a Wi-Fi network simply by entering an eight-digit PIN that’s printed on the router itself. Even if the network password or network name is changed, the PIN remains valid.

“This is a huge expletive-deleted security problem,” Horowitz said. “That eight-digit number will get you into the [router] no matter what. So a plumber comes over to your house, turns the router over, takes a picture of the bottom of it, and he can now get on your network forever.”

That eight-digit PIN isn’t even really eight digits, Horowitz explained. It’s actually seven digits, plus a final checksum digit. The first four digits are validated as one sequence and the last three as another, resulting in only 11,000 possible codes instead of 10 million.

“If WPS is active, you can get into the router,” Horowitz said. “You just need to make 11,000 guesses” — a trivial task for most modern computers and smartphones.

MORE: Best Antivirus Software and Apps

Then, there’s networking port 32764, which French security researcher Eloi Vanderbeken in 2013 discovered had been quietly left open on gateway routers sold by several major brands. Using port 32764, anyone on a local network — which includes a user’s ISP — could take full administrative control of a router, and even perform a factory reset, without a password.

The port was closed on most affected devices following Vanderbeken’s disclosures, but he later found that it could easily be reopened with a specially designed data packet that could be sent from an ISP.

“This is so obviously done by a spy agency, it’s amazing,” Horowitz said. “It was deliberate, no doubt about it.”

How to lock down your home router

The first step toward home router security, Horowitz said, is to make sure the router and modem are not a single device. Many ISPs lease such devices to customers, but they’ll have little control over their own networks.

“If you were given a single box, which most people I think call a gateway,” he said, “you should be able to contact the ISP and have them dumb down the box so that it acts as just a modem. Then you can add your own router to it.”

MORE: Modem vs. Router: How They’re Different and What They Do

Next, Horowitz recommended that customers buy a low-end commercial-grade Wi-Fi/Ethernet router, such as the Pepwave Surf SOHO, which retails for about $200, rather than a consumer-friendly router that can cost as little as $20. Commercial-grade routers are unlikely to have UPnP or WPS enabled. The Pepwave, Horowitz noted, offers additional features, such as firmware rollbacks in case a firmware update goes wrong.

Regardless of whether a router is commercial- or consumer-grade, there are several things, varying from easy to difficult, that home-network administrators can do to make sure their routers are more secure:

Easy fixes

Change the administrative credentials from the default username and password. They’re the first things an attacker will try. Your router’s instruction manual should show you how to do this; if it doesn’t, then Google it.

Change the network name, or SSID, from “Netgear,” “Linksys” or whatever the default is, to something unique — but don’t give it a name that identifies you.

“If you live in an apartment building in apartment 3G, don’t call your SSID ‘Apartment 3G,'” Horowitz quipped. “Call it ‘Apartment 5F.'”

Enable WPA2 wireless encryption so that only authorized users can hop on your network.

Disable Wi-Fi Protected Setup, if your router lets you.

Set up a guest Wi-Fi network and offer its use to visitors, if your router has such a feature. If possible, set the guest network to turn itself off after a set period of time.

“You can turn on your guest network, and set a timer, and three hours later, it turns itself off,” Horowitz said. “That’s a really nice security feature.”

If you have a lot of smart-home or Internet of Things devices, odds are many of them won’t be terribly secure. Connect them your guest Wi-Fi network instead of your primary network to minimize the damage resulting from any potential compromise of an IoT device.

Do not use cloud-based router management if your router’s manufacturer offers it. Instead, figure out if you can turn that feature off.

“This is a really bad idea,” Horowitz said. “If your router offers that, I would not do it, because now you’re trusting another person between you and your router.”

Many “mesh router” systems, such as Google Wifi and Eero, are entirely cloud-dependent and can interface with the user only through cloud-based smartphone apps. While those models offer security improvements in other areas, such as with automatic firmware updates, it might be worth looking for a mesh-style router that permits local administrative access, such as the Netgear Orbi.

MORE: What Is a Mesh Router, and Do You Need One?

Moderately difficult

Install new firmware when it becomes available — this is how router makers install security patches. Log into your router’s administrative interface routinely to check. With some brands, you may have to check the manufacturer’s website for firmware upgrades. Newer routers, including most mesh routers, will have automatically update the firmware. But have a backup router on hand if something goes wrong.

Set your router to use the 5-GHz band for Wi-Fi instead of the more standard 2.4-GHz band, if possible — and if all your devices are compatible.

“The 5-GHz band does not travel as far as the 2.4-GHz band,” Horowitz said. “So if there is some bad guy in your neighborhood a block or two away, he might see your 2.4-GHz network, but he might not see your 5-GHz network.”

Disable remote administrative access, and disable administrative access over Wi-Fi. Administrators should connect to routers via wired Ethernet only. (Again, this won’t be possible with many mesh routers.)

Advanced tips for more tech-savvy users

Change the settings for the administrative Web interface, if your router permits it. Ideally, the interface should enforce a secure HTTPS connection over a non-standard port, so that the URL for administrative access would be something like, to use Horowitz’s example, “https://192.168.1.1:82” instead of the more standard “http://192.168.1.1”, which by default uses the internet-standard port 80.

Use a browser’s incognito or private mode when accessing the administrative interface so that your new URL is not saved in the browser history.

Disable PING, Telnet, SSH, UPnP and HNAP, if possible. All of these are remote-access protocols. Instead of setting their relevant ports to “closed,” set them to “stealth” so that no response is given to unsolicited external communications that may come from attackers probing your network.

“Every single router has an option not to respond to PING commands,” Horowitz said. “It’s absolutely something you want to turn on — a great security feature. It helps you hide. Of course, you’re not going to hide from your ISP, but you’re going to hide from some guy in Russia or China.”

Change the router’s Domain Name System (DNS) server from the ISP’s own server to one maintained by OpenDNS (208.67.220.220,  208.67.222.222), Google Public DNS (8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4) or Cloudflare (1.1.1.1, 1.0.0.1)). If you’re using IPv6, the corresponding OpenDNS addresses are 2620:0:ccc::2 and 2620:0:ccd::2, the Google ones are 2001:4860:4860::8888 and 2001:4860:4860::8844, and the Cloudflare ones are 2606:4700:4700::1111 and 2606:4700:4700::1001.

Use a virtual private network (VPN) router to supplement or replace your existing router and encrypt all your network traffic.

“When I say VPN router, I mean a router that can be a VPN client,” Horowitz said. “Then, you sign up with some VPN company, and everything that you send through that router goes through their network. This is a great way to hide what you’re doing from your internet service provider.”

Many home Wi-Fi routers can be “flashed” to run open-source firmware, such as the DD-WRT firmware, which in turn supports the OpenVPN protocol natively. Most commercial VPN services support OpenVPN as well and provide instructions on how to set open-source routers up to use them.

Finally, use Gibson Research Corp.’s Shields Up port-scanning service at https://www.grc.com/shieldsup. It will test your router for hundreds of common vulnerabilities, most of which can be mitigated by the router’s administrator.

NEW MOON IN SAGITTARIUS: Bi-weekly Timeless Empath Reading ~ 11/26, 2019

Another awesome reading, thank you Lada! The “little death” is very revealing. 😉

Futurist Trendcast

Just posted new reading on TimelessEmpathChannel!

This is a very different tarot & oracle card reading for the collective ~ ALL SIGNS! My readings are TIMELESS & SYNCHRONICITY BASED: no matter what sign you are, whenever you tune in, you’ll find an important message you need to hear!

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NEW MOON IN SAGITTARIUS:

Bi-weekly Timeless Empath Reading ~ 11/26, 2019 

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