Killing the Buddha!

Killing the Buddha

If you meet the Buddha, kill him. (逢佛殺佛,逢祖殺祖)

Thinking about the Buddha as an entity or deity is delusion, not awakening. One must destroy the preconception of the Buddha as separate and external before one can become internally as their own Buddha. Zen master Shunryu Suzuki wrote in Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind during an introduction to Zazen,

Kill the Buddha if the Buddha exists somewhere else. Kill the Buddha, because you should resume your own Buddha nature.

One is only able to see a Buddha as he exists in separation from Buddha, the mind of the practitioner is thus still holding onto apparent duality.

http://heartflow2013.wordpress.com/2013/09/18/living-as-buddha/

 

 

FINAL TRANSMISSION

A wise old Zen master, very near death, lay quietly on his mat with his eyes closed, all his disciples gathered around. Kneeling closest to him was his number one disciple, a longtime practitioner who would succeed the old man as head of the monastery. At one point the old master opened his eyes, and lovingly gazed at each and every one of his disciples assembled in the crowded room. Finally his glance rested on his successor, and he managed to speak his last words to the man: “Ah, my son, you have a very thorough knowledge of the teachings and scriptures, and you have shown great discipline in keeping the precepts. Your behavior has, in fact, been flawless. Yet there is one more thing remaining to be cleared up: you still reek and stink of ‘Zen’!”

 

Be Natural:

http://heartflow2013.wordpress.com/2013/08/22/zen-shin-ku-myo-u/

O fortuna


A Japanese girl whose parents owned a food store lived near Zen master Hakuin, who at that point was still young, evidently in his 30s or 40s. One day the girl’s parents suddenly discovered she was pregnant and were very angry when she refused to confess the man’s identity. After much harassment she at last named the monk Hakuin. Furious, the parents went to confront the master. He would only say, “Is that so?”

Shortly after the child was born it was brought to Hakuin. By this time he had lost his reputation, all his disciples and students, which did not trouble him.

But he took very good care of the child, obtaining milk from neighbors and all else the child needed. A few months later the girl could not stand it any longer. She told her parents the truth—the child’s real father was a young man working at the fish market. At once the girl’s parents rushed to see Hakuin, apologetically explaining and begging forgiveness, and humbly asking to bring the child back to its mother and real father. Hakuin happily yielded the child to them, saying only: “Is that so?”

They’re just words, they ain’t worth nothing
Cloud your head and push your buttons
And watch how they just disappear
When we’re far away from here

And everybody knows where this is heading
Forgive me for forgetting
Our hearts irrevocably combined
Star-crossed souls slow dancing
Retreating and advancing
Across the sky until the end of time

Oh who put all those cares inside your head
You can’t live your life on your deathbed
And it’s been such a lovely day
Let’s not let it end this way

And everybody knows where this is heading
Forgive me for forgetting
Our hearts irrevocably combined
Star-crossed souls slow dancing
Retreating and advancing
Across the sky until the end of time

Like sisters and brothers we lean on each other
Like sweethearts carved on a headstone
Oh why even bother, it’ll be here tomorrow
It’s not worth it sleeping alone

And look at you and me still here together
There is no one knows you better
And we’ve come such a long long way
Let’s put it off for one more day

And everybody knows where this is heading
Forgive me for forgetting
Our hearts irrevocably combined
Star-crossed souls slow dancing
Retreating and advancing
Across the sky until the end of time

 

http://heartflow2013.wordpress.com/2013/08/11/verbal-teachings-and-silence-ramana/

http://heartflow2013.wordpress.com/2013/08/15/introduction-to-ramana-maharshi/

THE MASTER’S DHARMA TALK

Chan master Lin-ch’i (Linji, d.867) displayed a famously fiery approach with students—involving iconoclasm, paradoxical dialogue, explosive shouting (the famous kwatz!) and even slapping/striking. He inspired the influential Lin-ch’i Chan school in China (later Rinzai Zen in Japan). Among the transcribed talks we have from Lin-ch’i, here are excerpts on how he chided students (and certain fellow teachers!) for their obtuseness in not awakening to the Buddha-nature “right before/behind your eyes” as he called it:

“O you, followers of Truth… do not be deceived by others. Inwardly or outwardly, if you encounter any obstacles, lay them low right away. If you encounter the Buddha [as merely a mind object], slay him; if you encounter the Patriarch, slay him; if you encounter the parent or the relative, slay them all without hesitation, for this is the only way to deliverance. Do not get yourself entangled with any object, but stand above, pass on, and be free. As I see those so-called followers of Truth all over the country, there are none who come to me free and independent of objects. In dealing with them, I strike them down any way they come…. There are indeed so far none who have presented themselves before me all alone, all free, all unique. They are inevitably found caught by the idle tricks of the old masters! … They are all ghostly existences, ignominious gnomes haunting the woods, elf-spirits of the wilderness. They are madly biting into all heaps of filth. O you, why are you wasting all the pious donations of the devout [who give to the monastery]! Do you think you deserve the name of ‘monk’ when you are still entertaining mistaken ideas of Zen? You are putting another head over your own! What do you lack in yourselves? O you, followers of Truth, what you are making use of at this very moment is none other than what makes a Patriarch or a Buddha. But you do not believe me, and stupidly seek it outwardly…. There are no realities outside, nor is there anything [any “thing”] inside you may lay your hands on!”

And elsewhere Lin-ch’i said: “Students nowadays do not know the Dharma. They are like goats, nuzzling and nibbling at everything they come across. They cannot distinguish the servant from the master, nor the guest from the host.”

Other sayings from Lin-ch’i: “What is the frantic hurry to deck yourselves in a lion’s skin when all the while you are yapping like wild foxes? A real man has no need to give himself the airs of a real man!”

“Monks,… I spent twenty years with my late master, Huang-po. Three times I asked him on the essence of Buddhism, and three times he beat me. It was as if he had caressed me with a branch of fragrant sage. Now I feel like tasting a sound beating again; who can give it to me?” A monk stepped forward and said, “I can.” The master took up his stick and handed it to him. The monk hesitated to take hold of it. So the master hit him.

“A student wearing chains presents himself before the [mediocre or false] teacher. The teacher then puts another set of chains on him. The student is overjoyed. Neither the one nor the other are capable of discernment…. Followers of the Way, the true sentiment is very difficult, the Buddha-Dharma is a profound mystery. But if you understand, you smile. … Even if there is no form, the brightness shines of itself. But students have not enough faith. So they cling to names and phrases and try to find the meaning of these names. For fifty years and more they run about carrying their corpses, their staffs and bundles.”

 

More about the venerable Master Lin-ji :

http://heartflow2013.wordpress.com/2013/08/26/put-on-your-robe-as-a-free-person/#more-4433

About Self-Nature

A woman once asked Zen Master Seung Sahn, “Do you believe in God?”

“Of course!”

She became perplexed. “You are a Buddhist monk, and a Zen master, at that. How can you possibly believe in God?”

“I can believe my hands. I believe in my eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and mind. Why not believe in God? If you believe in your true self completely, then you can believe that the sky is blue, the tree is green, the dog is barking ‘Woof! Woof!’ It’s very simple, yah?”
The woman was silent for a moment.

Zen Master Seung Sahn continued, “Buddhism teaches, ‘One by one, each thing is complete.’ That means that your mind is complete. How is your mind complete? (Hits the floor with his Zen stick.) Just this point. Did you hear that? (Hits the floor.) That point is already complete. If you’re thinking, it’s not complete. But in this moment (hits the floor), just hear that sound. At that moment, this sound and you (hits the floor) already become one, which means you and the universe already become one. This means there’s no subject, no object; no inside, no outside. Inside and outside already become one. The name for that is absolute, or truth.

“So if you keep this mind (hits the floor), your mind is already complete. The sun, the moon, the stars, and everything are already complete. Your sound and my sound are the same. This sound (hits the floor) is your substance: this sound’s substance and your substance already become one; my substance and this sound’s substance already become one. It’s the same substance as the sun, the moon, and the stars—any substance is the same substance. So Buddhism teaches, ‘Each thing has it. It and dust interpenetrate.’ This means that sound’s substance, and name and form, already become one. Let us consider ice, water, and steam. The names and forms are different, but fundamentally it is all still H2O. Water is H2O. Ice is H2O. Steam is also H2O. Name and form are different, and constantly change according to conditions, but the substance is the same.”

“But this seems so difficult, and not related at all to the question of God,” the woman said.

“Put it all down, OK? If you’re thinking, this seems very difficult. If you’re not thinking, it’s no problem. If you’re thinking, you make ‘I’,’my,’ and ‘me.’ Descartes said, ‘I think, therefore I am.’ Thinking makes I; thinking makes everything. But if you are not thinking, then what? When you are thinking, you make this whole universe, you make everything. And then ‘I’ and ‘God’ and ‘Buddha’ and everything are separate. But if you keep this point (hits the floor)—this moment—then you and God are never separate. It’s very easy, yah?”

Additional metaphor:  “cover the world with leather…”

Koan of the day: Man Gong’s Net

One day, Zen Master Man Gong sat on the high rostrum
and gave the speech to mark the end of the three-month
winter retreat. “All winter long you monks have practiced
very hard. That’s wonderful! As for me, I had nothing to do,
so I made a net. This net is made out of a very special cord.
It is very strong and can catch all buddhas, patriarchs, and
every human being. It catches everything. How do you get
out of this net?” Some students shouted, “KATZ!”
Others hit the floor or raised a fist. One said, “The sky is blue,
the grass is green.” Another said, “Already got out.
How are you, great Zen Master?” From the back of the room,
a monk shouted, “Don’t make a net!” Many answers were
given, but to each, Man Gong only replied,
“Ah Ha! I’ve caught another BIG fish!”
So how do you get out of Man Gong’s net?

This intriguing Koan was sent to me by a dear friend. All he mentioned was this is an attack- style kong-an. HINT:  It’s naturally a trap for your mind. So whatever you think, say or do is “wrong”. So how do you get out of Man Gong’s net?  Hahaha. 😀